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of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
and magical ♪ ♪ the happy train's on track ♪ because america is back ♪ yeah! ♪ woo hoo! come on! ♪ - wait, what? [all cheering] - ♪ america is back ♪ america is back - wait, according to that scale, i still have a small wiener! - ♪ america is back - i'm still [bleep] angry! - ♪ back and we're back and we're back ♪ ♪ we're so back, we're so back ♪ ♪ back back back back back ♪ captioning sponsored by comedy central from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. [ cheers and applause ] >> john: welcome to the daily show. [ cheers and applause ] my name is john oliver. i am still sitting in for jon stewart who has been spending the entire summer at training camp with the new york giants. apparently he's extremely happy and in almost constant pain. our guest tonight tv legend and host of the new show crowd goes wild on fox 1 regis philbin is here. [ cheers and applause ] oh, yes, indeed. we start tonight with the news media. now, personally i get all my news from jon stewart and the daily show. which is why i have absolutel
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
in america and less than 7% of the land and it's important for lower property values for those uses to be maintained. i believe the port plays a large role in that and maintaining the uses are important component for maintaining diverse economic base for the city and for the businesses that have no where to go otherwise they would go outside the city to do what they need to do. it is true of course that waterfront access is a key component and i think one of the wonderful things about the san francisco waterfront it combines both of those things and maritime and public access scprt activities. it's not about wiping the slate clean and starting over so the plan has expanded the shoreline system. it has integrated areas for development and accept regional growth in a smart way. now we are looking at ways of implementing this work and what is causing some of the consternation out there is is that there are large sites out there and i understand that but it's important for staff to understand that the developments implement the planning work that we done and ensure that the connect
that there were special events that san francisco will often do. whether it be the america's cup, sunday games, giants streets they will wake up for the car that is typically legally parked on this their street and find out they can't get it back but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide thi
>>> making news in america this morning -- breaking overnight, a new terror threat, forcing precautions overseas. americans being told to leave another country. >>> wild world. the rain keeps coming in parts of the country. triggering flash floods and the dramatic rescue of a newborn baby. >>> facebook shocker. a woman found dead. the suspect's facebook friends get a look at the crime scene plus a confession. >>> and a man turned a trash dumpster into a home. complete with bed, bathroom, and that's not all. >>> good friday morning. u.s. interests in pakistan are under threat this morning because of new terror fears. the state department is warning americans against travel there. >> they say there's a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, pakistan's second-largest city. abc's kristin fisher joining us on the latest details from overnight. >> reporter: diana, john, the key word is specific. this is a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, which is why only a handful of emergency personnel have been allowed to stay. all americans are now being urg
attended the u.s. army war college in pin in pennsylvania. there are security issues where the america needs cooperation. the security and the u.s. warships routinely transit an. each day in egypt fuel the call to cutoff aid. the detention of sti of spiritul leader brought this from the white house. >> that's not in line of the standard to uphold in respect to human rights. >> the relationship we skwreupt is deep. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to th
>>> making news in america this morning, tensions rise today. teams poised to probe a suspected chemical attack in syria as washington moves one step closer to military action. we are live with the latest. >>> growing concerns. a raging wildfire shows no signs of slowing down this california, and it could soon start affecting the water supply of an entire city. >>> hit-and-run on the racetrack. a driver takes out the pit crew costing him the race. who is really to blame? >>> the reunion, the performances and the outfits. we have the good, the bad and the ugly, the very ugly, on the mtv video music awards. ♪ >>> good morning, everyone. we begin with the mounting crisis in syria pushing the u.s. one step closer to military action. >> as the u.n. weapons inspections team today heads to the site of an apparent chemical weapons attack, last week the u.s. was considering its military options. abc's devin dwyer has the very, and he has latest from washington. >> reporter: good morning, diana and john. that's right, u.s. officials are in the midst of urgent consultations over syria. t
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. that's the headlines "consider this" is up next on al jazeera. ♪ ♪ >>> measles outbreak in texas has been linked to a so-called mega church where ministers have questioned the use of vaccinations. at least 21 people from the illness. health officials and the church itself are trying to contain the outbreak by hosting vaccination clinics. doctors say a visitor to the church who was infected with measles likely spread it to the population at the community church. >>> it's a bit like having a snow day off, but across the midwest, it's heat not wintery weather that is closing schools. the sweltering temperatures have closed schools. those who
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
is going to be able to sell cricket to america. >> you never heard of gorgey thompson. >> john: i do. she knows you and i've been asking her about you. >> john: whoa! after the show we'll talk. john: she's fantastic. she was on the news for years. >> ten years. john: good luck selling cricket. >> do you play cricket. john: you know what? everything in britain is class based. so cricket is for posh people. >> really? john: that's not for the likes of me. i know i sound like it. >> what sport did you play as a kid growing up. >> john: soccer. religiously. >> it's a big deal. it's getting bigger and bigger in america. >> john: i want to be a soccer player more than anything else. this was very much plan-b. >> how in the world did this happen? you wanted to play soccer and here you are. >> john: it was a complete lack of physical ability. and that's all. >> you couldn't kick the ball. john: are you a frustrated athlete as well? >> i used to play in bronx park. john: play what? baseball. john: classic. a little football. yeah, sure. >> john: you're a yankee fan. yes, i am. (a few people in the
to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [ command center ] this is command center. [ man ] ...3, 2, 1. [ command center ] all systems go. [ female announcer ] introducing swiffer steamboost powered by bissell. steam-activated cleaning pads penetrate deep. [ command center ] we have lift off. [ female announcer ] don't just clean your floor. boost it. >>> live from america's news headquarters, i'm kelly wright. a massive wildfire triggering a state of emergency in san francisco. the flames are about 150 miles away in yosemite national park. but the city's utilities are in danger, as miles of power lines lay in the path of the fire. officials say san francisco has been forced to shut down two of the power stations so far. further disruption could have effect on the power su
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
holly williams they're advising america where to attack. and is the comeback over? wall street worries about war and housing. >> a cbs news poll finds race relations are going backward in the u.s. we're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final
to be the least aggrieved black man in america to be palatable to the wider electorate and that's what he did in 2008. we're now in 2013. he's been elected twice. it's the 50th anniversary. i don't see how he can speak without dealing directly with the issue of race without going there today. and then doing something else. not only talking about the issues that we kind of know how to address and know how to solve, vote rights, for example, we see was happening, we know how to organize. we know how to fight that. we have the tools and the laws in place to fight that. there are other things that are more complicated and more difficult to work on. the patterns of residential segregation that have led to schools in many parts of the country being segregated now as they were in 1970s or 1960s. that sort of thing is much more diffuse, much more complicated and that's what i hope i hear more about today not just from the president, but from other speakers as well. >> chris, to you gene's points the question of segregation in american society would seem to be settled but it's not you look at the stat
. and so, after nine years of separation an arrival gate in america. pure joy. >> hi, daddy. christie maynard who heard their story stepped in to help the family. >> very pretty. >> reporter: she took her on a shopping trip on her first day in america. >> it is so cool. >> yeah, let's go. it is so overwhelming, it makes me feel complete. >> reporter: and she already has a big american dream. >> i want to be a doctor, like for women who is pregnant, and small kids. >> reporter: ast steory that red us, sometimes god smiles and those who lived through dark days in africa can find light in a country founded on hope. bob woodruff, abc news, new york. >> what a great way. >> love that story. >> what a great we to end our newscast. the family reunited after nine years. boy do they have stories to tell each other. >> what a wonderful young woman she is. >> she will be a doctor. >> bet you she will. >> i can't wait to see it happen. good for them. >> see you in a little bit. ♪ >>> this the new york city police department now has to be part of the solution because the judge has agreed with us
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
're black or white, latino, asian america or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people -- >> the actual anniversary is wednesday, that is when president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial along with former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. close tore home, hundreds of people marched in san jose, they walked about a mile to the county building shouting, slogans and drumming. there was one woman who marched in washington 50 years ago and sat in her view there has been significant progress that more needs to be done. still ahead this morning what san francisco has to do to live up to the i have a dream speech. >>> on the action san francisco may take against nevada for dumping mentally ill patients in california. surfers and swimmers banned because of a shark. >> the weather department much more tranquil we're looking for a pleasant area once we dispense look at the nation's midsection. they're heating up and they're cooling down, good forecast for you after a break. ,,,, bay area headlines... stins beach is re-opening t
for the the cup. abc7 news reporter lilian kim is live at the america's cup park. hi, lilian. >> ama, two sailing power houses will be facing off in less than two weeks. it is not really a surprise, but fans are excited nonetheless. >> it is a clean start. >> em rete's team new zealand faced off against the luna rosa for the final time. in the end the kimi came out ahead as they had for most of the series. team new zealand now advances to the premiere event, the america's cup where they will take on the defending champion or cal team usa. they stressed how important it is for them to win. >> one thing my dad told me was never to start a speech with an apology. the only reason we are in san francisco is to take the cup away. >> relations have been tense for quite some time. things got worse in recent weeks when team new zealand accused oracle of cheating after it modified its boats during warm up races. sailing enthusiasts say it will be a good match up. >> i think they will put up a good fight. >> i think oracle has their work cut out for them to be sure. but we always have to root for the americ
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
to become -- we're marching towards becoming the most economically robust parks program in america. we had a cell phone app, parka meanttionv, park hours, park programs. we can now register online and having wi-fi in our parks will make it easier for park users and frankly our staff to deliver the programs and services that the public expects in our open space. so, we're thrilled ~. government can't do it alone any more, so, this is really about partnership. we're so thankful to google and veronika, thank you for hanging with us. thank you to sf city. a big thanks to mark, supervisor farrell for stewarding this. and also a big thanks to the mayor who has really given us room to be innovative, room to pursue public private partnerships and has really supported innovation in our parks. and, john, thank you for hosting us here. supervisor avalos has been an incredible advocate for our neighborhood parks and one of the things great about this gift, this is not just going to parks frequented by tourists or destination parks. this is a benefit that is going into our neighborhoods. so, we're real
>>> making news in america this morning -- growing pressure. the obama administration says a chemical weapons attack did kill hundreds of people in syria, as the u.s. moves closer to military action. we're live in washington with the latest. >>> gaining ground. firefighters finally making progress on a massive wildfire burning near yosemite national park. but the concern is far from over. >>> subway scare. an elderly man gets his foot stuck in a train door and goes on a terrifying ride. >>> and caught off guard. what question puzzled the beauty pageant contestant, prompting this response -- >> and believing when you see, it's perfect. >>> good tuesday morning, everyone. we begin with the growing crisis in syria and what is increasingly appearing to be an imminent u.s. strike against the assad regime. >> it comes after u.n. weapons inspectors visited the apparent site of a chemical attack last week. and now, this morning, the strongest words yet from a u.s. official. abc's devin dwyer has the latest from washington. good morning, devin. >> reporter: good morning. the strong
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and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >>a. >> >> >> meteorologist: well, we're going to update quite a bit of weather around the united states as well as mexico. i want to take you to california. we're still looking at some intense rain towards the south. unfortunately, it's not getting over here towards the west where we need it, where the wildfires are burning, but for california, nevada, as well as parts of montana as well you're seeing quite a bit of rain, and flash flooding is going to be a major issue for y
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